dnEditor – Opensource .NET decompiler using dnlib

Thought I’d share another neat project with you today created by ViRb3 which you can find at: dnEditor on GitHub.

It’s a .NET decompiler in it’s early stages of development which uses dnlib by 0xd4d as the engine to load assemblies. This means it’ll load pretty much every .NET assembly, obfuscated or not, without any issues. It has support for IL->C# decompilation using ILSpy as a base. It has a simple but user-friendly interface similar to ILSpy and Reflector:

dnEditor user interface

If you have used Reflexil before you’ll find a familiar interface in the instruction editor in dnEditor:

Instruction editor in dnEditor

Another cool feature is the color-coded IL blocks and instructions similar to SimpleAssemblyExplorer:

IL blocks

You should keep your eyes on this project as it’s being actively developed and I might even take a shot at contributing some to it myself in the future.

Make sure you check out ViRb3’s profile on GitHub: ViRb3 GitHub profile or on the RTN board: ViRb3 RTN profile

RTN-Team forum

If you’re interested in the work I do on this blog, and have a general interest in programming and/or reverse engineering you should check out a forum I’m a part of over at RTN-Team forum. It focuses on questions/help/releases related to reverse engineering but there a lot of experienced coders available to help out too.

It’s a small community right now and we want to keep it rather small, but with high quality content and members. Quality over quantity, you know. So please consider going over there and signup and hopefully join the community.

Once again the link is: https://www.rtn-team.cc/board/

There is some more content coming to the blog as well soon, so stay tuned for that.:)

10,000+ hits

Thought I’d just make a little post celebrating my blog getting over 10,000 hits! Granted a lot of them are repeat views, but I’d still count it as a milestone for me. Additionally I’m sorry for the severe lack of content posted lately on this blog. I’ve had a lot of stuff going on in my personal life lately so I haven’t had much time to code or do reverse engineering.

I have a few really interesting project ideas that I hope to be able to work on and post about on here soon enough. Unfortunately I don’t have a time frame for when that’s gonna happen as I don’t know how much free time I’ll have over for coding.

Either way, thank you all for taking interest in my work.:-)

Confuserex feature map

Confuserex feature map

There are a lot of powerful features in ConfuserEx, including ones that are rarely used because they are not publically documented and require some analyzing of the source code to discover. That’s why I decided to take the time and cover all these ‘hidden’ features and show them so you can use ConfuserEx’s full potential.

Dissecting ConfuserEx – Constants protection

It’s been a while since my last Dissecting ConfuserEx paper and I’m sorry for that! I’ll try to keep up better. Anyway this is the latest one in the series and it covers the constants protection in ConfuserEx, talks about 2 ways of deobfuscating it and also how to dump the decrypted strings with WinDbg. I feel as if this wasn’t the best tutorial really, but if someone has tips or feedback let me know and I’ll update it.

Introduction:

This protection works by taking every string and constant in the assembly, encrypt and compress them and put them into a resource. Generally in obfuscators the enrypted data is stored in an embedded resource. This was the case in Confuser 1.9, but in ConfuserEx it’s done a bit differently with a more creative way.

Read it here: Dissecting ConfuserEx – Constants Protection